Category Archives: Enivironmentalism

Weeds in the Garden

“What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have never been discovered.”

~Ralph Waldo Emerson

Or, even better yet… EAT THEM!

That’s right, I said it.

Weeds.

If you can’t beat ’em, EAT ’em.

Most weeds are edible at some point in their growth. Even tumbleweeds here in the Southwest!


U.S. Farm Subsidies


Blog Action Day: Food–Guess What? There’s Enough

Blog Action Day: Food–Guess What? There’s Enough.


Fluoride: did you know it is bad for you?

Excerpt from Organic Bytes:

 

Consumer Alert on Water Fluoridation: 41% of American Teenagers Have This Disease

The CDC, ADA, and local health officials continue to promote fluoridation even though just this January, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommended a nation-wide reduction in fluoride levels after it learned that 41 percent of American adolescents, ages 12-15, have dental fluorosis, a clear sign of overexposure to fluoride, and that the rate is continuing to increase steadily.

Only now is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Water reviewing the allowable amount of fluoride in drinking water, more than four years after the National Research Council reported to Congress that the current allowable fluoride levels (MCL/MCLG) were too high.

In the face of lax federal regulation, health activists are acting locally. More than 250 communities that have rejected fluoridation.

This year in New Hampshire and Arkansas, citizen groups got legislation introduced at the state-level which would require notices on all municipal water bills warning parents not to feed infants fluoridated water. Citizens in Tennessee, led by the Lillie Center were successful in getting a prominent team of bi-partisan legislators to call for an end to the promotion of fluoridation by the state. In Alaska, Fluoride Free Fairbanks along with many concerned citizens urged their city council to review fluoridation, and in March the city council’s task force charged with studying the issue recommended that the city stop adding fluoride to their water. Clearly, a small group of educated and dedicated citizens can accomplish a lot when they organize locally against fluoridation.


Great grocery store model to replicate!

in.gredients

A zero waste grocery store.

Lovin this model! Package free! What a fantastic store and why in the world is this the first of its kind in the U.S.??? Lets get this idea growing and catching like wildfire!

I am quite suprised in fact that this doesn’t exist in Portland!

All of you in TX better support this store!!

 


Happy 100 blog posts and other news!

I just realized that I have reached the 100 posts mark!

I cannot believe I have written that much in the months since I began this blog!

Thanks to all of you that keep on reading!

 

I also wanted to share a couple of exciting links regarding my field school:

I will be showing my own 5 minute media piece on Mutual Aid Societies with some of my peers. I will share it on here eventually no doubt, as well. Speaking of… I better get back to work! 🙂


Get your read on!

I have a few books that I wanted to pass on to all of you with high recommendations!

I was assigned several books to read for my Foodshed Field School Course as follows:

  1. Imhoff, D. (ed.). 2010. The CAFO Reader. Watershed Media.
  2. Franceschini, A. and D. Tucker. 2010. Farm Together Now: A Portrait of people, places, and ideas for a new food movement. Chronicle Books, San Francisco.
  3. Rodríguez, Sylvia. 2006. Acequia: Watersharing, Sanctity, and Place. School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe.
  4. World Economic Forum. 2011. Water Security: The Water-Food-Energy-Climate Nexus Island Press. ISBN-10: 1597267368.

Now, a quick check on that list… The number 4 book I would NOT recommend. I read a good portion of it and it raised the hair on my neck a few times. Part of the contributors for the text are CEOs of CocaCola and Pepsi. Obvious hidden agenda with companies like that telling others how they should conserve water!! It takes over 16 gallons of water to make just one 12oz can of soda… Think about it.

The other books are good reads so far.

It was hard in the last month to actually get any reading in during the field school but I am catching up now. I am nearly done with Farm Together Now and love love love this book. The CAFO book is graphic and harsh but that never stops me from reading on. The truth hurts at times 😉 The Acequia text I have actually used as a reference before for other school works I have written.

I would recommend book number2 the most.

The book that I really want all of you to read besides Farm Together Now is:

The Dirty Life: On Farming, Food, and Love.

 

I could not put this book down. It is so open, inspiring, and real. I always thought of myself as settling down later in life to run some sort of farm but this book has made me think why wait? It really was almost more informative that all of the texts that I was assigned during the field school. I referenced it so many times in discussions en route to new locations on our NM foodshed tour that my peers dubbed it “my bible”. I love this model though. How more connected to your food, land, love, and community can you get than this??

Read it and get inspired!

For more about the book/farm/author here are some links: